CACP Bulletin

Fall 2017

Issue link: http://digital.imedianorthside.com/i/868757

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 8 of 13

A lot has changed since the search for a missing child included printing the information on the back of a milk carton. But what hasn't changed is the need to spread that information as far as possible, so everyone in the community can help police bring that child to safety. "If we have a missing child, that is a community issue," says Superintendent Cliff O'Brien of the Calgary Police Service. O'Brien has been working with the Missing Children Society of Canada since 2010 when CEO Amanda Pick approached Calgary Police with technology that would make informing the community about a missing child faster than ever before. The technology had been developed for, and donated to the Society, or MCSC, and centred the idea that information from police could be shared through social media and also via a mobile app. In both cases, MCSC would work with police using those tools to alert people about a missing child. "When I first heard what she was proposing, it made sense," says O'Brien, who is in charge of Criminal Operations, Technical Support Division. He could see the value for police in getting communication support from an agency such as MCSC. The concept of social media sharing included allowing users to 'donate' their social media feeds to MCSC. In doing so, they agreed that information from police about AMBER Alerts or Urgent Missing Child Alerts in their area would immediately be sent to their Facebook friends and Twitter followers. Pick says the idea for the mobile app started after a Calgary-based oil company wanted to do more for MCSC than just donate money. Its features were especially interesting to police. The app, which was named CodeSearch™ and developed by RallyEngine, would be downloaded to mobile devices by interested employees and used when police needed help in a child search. The app's ability to geo-locate users made it possible to target people with information shared by police, such as pictures, licence plate numbers and other descriptions vital in a search. After those initial meetings, Calgary police worked closely with MCSC to refine the way the technology would be used, help that Pick 6 CACP Fall 2017 IS YOUR POLICE SERVICE USING THE MCSC MOST VALUABLE NETWORK? By: Christine Diemert, Senior News Editor, MSN

Articles in this issue

view archives of CACP Bulletin - Fall 2017